25 - 28 June, 2024

Stockholm | Sweden

25 - 28 June, 2024

Stockholm | Sweden

Plenary and semi-plenary Lectures

ECC24 will feature plenary and semi-plenary lectures as well as the 2024 European Control Award plenary lecture.

More information will be available soon.

  1. Date – Lecture Title 1
  2. Date – Lecture Title 2
  3. Date – Lecture Title 3
  4. Date – Lecture Title 4
  5. Date – Lecture Title 5

ECC24 will feature plenary and semi-plenary lectures with the following speakers:

Michael Jordan, Ambra Sannino, Maryam Kamgarpour, Alessandro Chiuso, Giulia Giordano,

Tryphon Georgiou, Gabriela Hug, Claudio de Persis, and Martina Maggio

Michael Jordan – Uncertainty, Asymmetry of Information, and Statistical Contract Theory

Abstract:

Contract theory is the study of economic incentives when parties transact in the presence of private information.  We augment classical contract theory to incorporate a role for learning from data, where the overall goal of the adaptive mechanism is to obtain desired
statistical behavior.  We consider applications of this framework to problems in federated
learning, the delegation of data collection, and principal-agent regulatory mechanisms.

Speaker Bio:

Michael I. Jordan is the Pehong Chen Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his Masters in Mathematics from Arizona State University, and earned his PhD in Cognitive Science in 1985 from the University of California, San Diego. He was a professor at MIT from 1988 to 1998. His research interests bridge the computational, statistical, cognitive, biological and social sciences. Prof. Jordan is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Foreign Member of the Royal Society. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was the inaugural winner of the World Laureates Association (WLA) Prize in 2022. He received the Ulf Grenander Prize from the American Mathematical Society in 2021, the IEEE John von Neumann Medal in 2020, the IJCAI Research Excellence Award in 2016, the David E. Rumelhart Prize in 2015, and the ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award in 2009. He gave the Inaugural IMS Grace Wahba Lecture in 2022, the IMS Neyman Lecture in 2011, and an IMS Medallion Lecture in 2004. He was a Plenary Lecturer at the International Congress of Mathematicians in 2018.
In 2016, Prof. Jordan was named the “most influential computer scientist” worldwide in an article in Science, based on rankings from the Semantic Scholar search engine.

Michael Jordan

Professor
Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
University of California, Berkeley, USA

Ambra Sannino – Automation and Control in the Electric Power Grid to 2050

Abstract:

The electric power grid is sometimes described as the largest and most complex machine in the world, and it is not going to get any simpler going forward. Technologies such as automation and control, data and communication, today seen as welcome additional features to improve performance and efficiency of the power grid, will increasingly become critical building blocks of a secure, green, and digital system fulfilling the sustainability targets. The talk will give an overview of future trends and needs in the area, with some illustrative examples.

Speaker Bio:

Ambra Sannino joined Vattenfall as Vice President, Research and Development (R&D) in August 2023. Previously, she was with the global manufacturer ABB for 15 yrs (2004-2019) holding management positions in R&D, Technology, Product Management, in the area of Power Grids. Between 2019 and 2023, she was with DNV, a provider of services in energy sector, holding leadership roles in power grids in Northern Europe. Ambra has a Ph.D. in Power Engineering from the University of Palermo in Italy, and is a Doctor of Science (Docent) from Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. Prior to joining the industry, she was for a few years an Associate Professor in Power Systems at Chalmers University. She holds ca 10 patents and has authored and co-authored more than 50 papers on power electronics in power systems and distributed generation. Ambra is a Cigré member, a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and Chair of the IEEE Power & Energy / Power Electronics Joint Chapter in Sweden. She serves as a board member of the organizations Power Circle AB and Kraftkvinnorna, and as an expert reviewer for the Swedish Energy Agency, in the program Vehicle Strategic Research and Innovation.

Ambra Sannino

Vice President
Research and Development
Vattenfall, Sweden

Maryam Kamgarpour – Decision-making in uncertain, dynamic, and interactive environments

Abstract:

Modern applications of control involve decision-making in complex interactive systems: intelligent transportation, smart power grid, and assistive robotics. To reliably apply automation to these tasks, we need to account for uncertainties arising from modelling complexities and the interactions in the subsystems. This gives rise to novel challenges for control, at the intersection of learning theory and game theory. This plenary will spotlight recent developments on advancing stochastic control, reinforcement learning, and multiagent control to address these challenges. I will highlight our technical contributions in learning safe controllers and multiagent equilibria. The talk will showcase examples of applying the developed theory to the real world and conclude by highlighting open research challenges.

Speaker Bio:

Maryam Kamgarpour is a professor in the School of Engineering of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. Prior to EPFL, she served as a faculty at the University of British Columbia and at ETH Zürich. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley and a Bachelor of Applied Science from University of Waterloo, Canada. Her research is on stochastic control and multiagent learning and control. Her theoretical research is motivated by fascinating control problems arising in intelligent transportation systems, robotics, and power grid systems. She was awarded the European Union Starting Grant (2016-2021) to advance her research on control and game theory for integrating renewable energy into the power system. Her work on distributed control received the IEEE Transactions on Control of Network Systems Outstanding Paper Award (2022). She collaborated with NASA on safe and fuel-efficient aircraft trajectory design, and for this work received the NASA High Potential Individual Award (2010). She is passionate about understanding and addressing fundamental problems in control, and mentoring students to work with her on these problems. Her publications have contributed to theory of hybrid systems (reachability, safety and optimal control), distributed control (the role of information structure), game theory (learning equilibria under bandit feedback), mechanism design (coalition-proofness, price of anarchy), safe zeroth-order learning, inverse reinforcement learning and multiagent reinforcement learning.

Maryam Kamgarpour

Professor
School of Engineering
EPFL, Switzerland

Alessandro Chiuso – A personal journey on data-driven control: the role of models and beyond

Abstract:

In this talk I will offer a personal view on the latest developments in the area of so-called data-driven predictive control. Particular emphasis shall be given to the highly debated issue of direct vs. indirect methods as well as on the role models play, explicitly or implicitly, in control design, thus providing a connection with system identification. In doing so, I will establish a probabilistic Bayesian framework for data-driven predictive control that encompasses most existing approaches such as DeePC and Subspace Predictive Control as special cases. I shall argue that the probabilistic system-theoretic viewpoint is the cornerstone for enabling on-line data-driven closed-loop predictive control.

Speaker Bio:

Alessandro Chiuso (Fellow IEEE, 2022) received the Laurea degree (summa cum laude) in telecommunication engineering from the University of Padova, Padua, Italy, in 1996, and the Ph.D. degree in system engineering from the University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, in 2000. He is currently a Professor with the Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova. He has been a Visiting Research Scholar with the Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA, and a Post-Doctoral Fellow with the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. His current research interests include data-driven control, machine learning, identification and their applications. Dr. Chiuso serves or has served as a member of several conference program committees and technical committees and has been in the editorial board of several journals, among which Automatica, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, European Journal of Control, IET Control Theory & Applications. Since 2022 he is Editor (System Identification and Filtering) for Automatica.

Alessandro Chiuso

Professor
Department of Information Engineering
University of Padova, Italy

Giulia Giordano – Robustness in Nature: A Journey across Biology and Epidemiology

Abstract:

Natural systems across biology, ecology and epidemiology can be seen as dynamical networks, composed of multiple subsystems that interact according to an interconnection topology. Despite their large scale and complexity, most systems in nature exhibit extraordinary robustness: fundamental properties and qualitative behaviours that are crucial for survival are preserved even in the presence of huge parameter variations and environmental fluctuations. We discuss systems-and-control approaches to unravel the key features of biological systems and find the roots of their amazing robustness, by identifying properties and emerging behaviours that exclusively depend on the system structure, regardless of parameter values. We also consider epidemiological systems along with control approaches to cope with uncertain parameter values and optimally curb the contagion

Speaker Bio:

Giulia Giordano leads the Dynamical Networks and Systems Biology group at the Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Italy. She received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees summa cum laude, and the Ph.D. degree with honours in Systems and Control Theory, from the University of Udine, Italy. She was a Research Fellow at Lund University, Sweden, from 2016 to 2017, and an Assistant Professor at the Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, from 2017 to 2019. Giulia serves as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Control Systems Letters and for Automatica. She was selected as Outstanding Reviewer by the IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control in 2016 and by the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2020, and as the Outstanding Associate Editor of the IEEE Control Systems Letters in 2021. Giulia received the EECI Ph.D. Award 2016, the NAHS Best Paper Prize 2017, and the SIAM Activity Group on Control and Systems Theory Prize 2021 for “significant contributions to the development of innovative methodologies for the structural analysis of networked control systems and their applications to biological networks”. Her main research interests include the analysis and the control of dynamical networks, with applications especially to biology and epidemiology.

Giulia Giordano

Professor
Department of Industrial Engineering
University of Trento, Italy

Tryphon Georgiou – Stochastic Control meets Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics: Fundamental limits of power generation in thermodynamic engines

Abstract:

Thermodynamics was born in the 19th century in quest of a way to quantify efficiency of steam engines at the dawn of the industrial age. In the time since, thermodynamics has impacted virtually all other areas in science, from chemistry and biology to the physics of black holes, and yet, progress beyond the classical quasi-static limit towards finite-time thermodynamic transitions has been slow; finite-time is of essence for non-vanishing power generation. In recent years a deeper understanding of non-equilibrium processes has been achieved based on stochastic models with degrees of freedom (state variables) that are subject to Brownian excitation that models heat baths. Within this framework we will explain energy transduction, we will give insights on how anisotropy in thermal or chemical potentials can be tapped for power generation in engineered and physical processes, and we will highlight fundamental bounds on the amount of power that can drawn during finite-time thermodynamic transitions.
The talk is based on joint works with Rui Fu, Olga Movilla, Amir Taghvaei and Yongxin Chen. Research funding by AFOSR, ARO and NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

Speaker Bio:

Tryphon T. Georgiou is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of California, Irvine, and a Professor Emeritus at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Georgiou joined the faculty of the University of California, Irvine in 2016 after almost thirty years at the University of Minnesota, where he held the Vincentine Hermes-Luh Chair (2002-2016) and served as a co-director of the Center for Control Science and Dynamical Systems at the University of Minnesota (1990-2016). He was educated at the National Technical University of Athens, Greece (1979) and the University of Florida, Gainesville (PhD. 1983). Professor Georgiou is a Fellow of the IEEE, SIAM, IFAC, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA).

Tryphon Georgiou

Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
University of California, USA

Gabriela Hug – Data and Control as Key Enablers of Sustainable Electric Power Systems

Abstract:

The push towards replacing fossil-fuel and nuclear based power plants with renewable generation and the electrification of the transport and the heating sector overall result in less predictable electric energy supply and a significant increase in the demand. Furthermore, the fact that wind and PV resources are connected to the power system via inverters changes the system dynamics. Despite all these challenges, there are also new opportunities such as the higher degree of freedom in terms of control of inverter-connected systems or the fact that the additional load is flexible. Leveraging the availability of large amounts of data and the deployment of ubiquitous automation play crucial roles in addressing the challenges and seizing the opportunities in future electric power systems. The goal of this talk is to show examples of how data and control can support the transition to sustainable energy system which is becoming increasingly complex to operate.

Speaker Bio:

Gabriela Hug was born in Baden, Switzerland. She received the M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering and the Ph.D. degree from ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland, in 2004 and 2008, respectively. After the Ph.D. degree, she worked with the Special Studies Group of Hydro One, Toronto, ON, Canada. From 2009 to 2015, she was an Assistant Professor with Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. She is currently a Professor with the Power Systems Laboratory, ETH Zürich and co-director of the NCCR Automation. Her research interests include control and optimization of electric power systems. Dr. Hug received many professional and academic awards, including NSF CAREER Award, the IEEE PES Outstanding Young Engineer Award and the ETH Zürich Art of Leadership Award.

Gabriela Hug

Professor
Power Systems Laboratory
ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Claudio de Persis – A data-centric viewpoint on feedback linearization

Abstract:

The feedback linearization problem determines a change of state and input coordinates that reduces nonlinear control systems to linear ones, considerably simplifying the design of controllers. Being based on geometric conditions, the feedback linearization problem is hard to solve when the system’s model is unknown or uncertain. In this talk we discuss a new method that can learn the change of coordinates from a library of candidate functions. When the dynamics of the system are known, the method reduces to solving a set of linear equations. Remarkably, the same idea extends to the case in which the dynamics are unknown and a solution must be found using a finite number of experimental data.

Speaker Bio:

Claudio De Persis is a professor with the Engineering and Technology Institute, University of Groningen, the Netherlands, since 2011. He received his Ph.D. degree in Engineering from the University of Rome “la Sapienza”, Italy, in 2000, after which he was a postdoctoral researcher with Washington University in St. Louis and Yale University. Before joining the University of Groningen, he was with the University of Rome “la Sapienza” and Twente University, Enschede, the Netherlands. His research interest is in automatic control and its applications.

Claudio de Persis

Professor
Engineering and Technology Institute
University of Groningen, the Netherlands

Martina Maggio – What happens when embedded controllers are subject to deadline misses?

Abstract:

Microcontrollers play a crucial role in today’s control technology, such as in smart bikes, cars, and drones. They need to perform tasks promptly with limited processing power. However, the complexity of these tasks can lead to longer processing times, increasing the risk of failing to compute control signals within the required time frame. This could potentially damage the system and endanger users. This talk summarizes several years of research focused on analyzing embedded controllers, highlighting the effect of computational delays that lead to missed deadlines. We will discuss different types of timing violations, including bursts of missed deadlines, constrained patterns, and sporadic misses. By integrating these scenarios with detailed insights into the control systems’ implementation and correlating our analysis with practical applications, we aim to provide a comprehensive view of deadline-miss tolerance for embedded controllers. Finally, we will demonstrate the validity of our findings through extensive simulations and real-world experiments, showcasing the practical implications of our research.

Speaker Bio:

Martina Maggio is a Professor at the Department of Automatic Control, Lund University since 2023 and at the Computer Science Department, Saarland University since March 2020. She completed her Ph.D. at Politecnico di Milano, working with Alberto Leva on the applications of control-theoretical tools for the design of computing systems. During her Ph.D. Martina spent one year as a visiting graduate student at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT, working with Anant Agarwal and Hank Hoffmann on the Self-Aware Computing project. She joined Lund University in 2012 as a postdoctoral researcher, working with Karl-Erik Årzén on resource allocation for cloud infrastructures and real-time systems. Martina became an Assistant Professor in 2014, and then Docent and Associate Professor in 2017. In 2019, she spent a sabbatical year at Bosch Corporate Research in Renningen, Germany, working with Dirk Ziegenbein and Arne Hamann on the verification and validation of control systems in presence of deadline misses and computational faults. She conducts research at the intersection between computer science and control theory.

Martina Maggio

Professor
Department of Automatic Control
Lund University, Sweden

Name of Lecture 3

Date & Time:

Wednesday, June 27, 2021 @ 8:30-9:30

Location:

C-0-Auditorium (streaming at P-1-Aula Magna) View Map

Abstract:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus ac arcu eget enim ornare mattis accumsan eu elit. Cras vitae placerat sem. Sed et pulvinar dui. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Nam venenatis pharetra ipsum sit amet volutpat. Aenean tempor non urna ut tempus. In hac habitasse platea dictumst.

Sed fringilla rutrum urna, id accumsan nulla facilisis eget. Pellentesque luctus risus interdum, lacinia magna vulputate, elementum lacus. In nec massa orci. Proin vitae gravida sapien. Donec vehicula rutrum ornare. Morbi finibus, leo nec sagittis lacinia, sapien leo aliquet justo, at malesuada neque dui quis tellus. Nullam dictum arcu id risus euismod elementum. Integer ultricies elit dolor, eget molestie leo vehicula sit amet. Maecenas vel aliquam eros. Fusce egestas vel orci auctor scelerisque. Integer pellentesque vitae sapien at pellentesque. Donec odio sem, auctor ut vestibulum in, sollicitudin ut lorem.

Vivamus vitae auctor lectus, eget vestibulum lectus. Mauris rhoncus ante neque, et volutpat diam molestie et. Vivamus nec mi porta, interdum turpis vitae, malesuada purus. Nullam ac eros odio. Mauris semper velit sit amet erat dapibus, a maximus orci feugiat. Praesent nibh odio, auctor id aliquam at, dictum quis dui. Nullam eget libero id velit luctus posuere. Proin sit amet elit facilisis, imperdiet felis ut, lacinia elit. Quisque venenatis lorem ut felis suscipit iaculis.

Aenean tempor fringilla dapibus. Mauris tincidunt facilisis orci, eu venenatis ligula. Aenean nec massa tellus. Sed hendrerit dolor id est tristique posuere. In quam elit, tincidunt vitae mauris vel, congue consequat enim. Sed consectetur, libero id consectetur varius, quam lorem blandit arcu, vitae facilisis tortor tortor sed ligula. Curabitur et rutrum orci, id rhoncus tortor. Vivamus iaculis eros consectetur faucibus gravida. Phasellus eu elementum libero. Duis sed metus in risus rhoncus dictum quis rutrum metus.

Speaker Bio:

[Speaker bio]

John Smith

Professor
Dept. of Computer Science
University of California, Davis

Name of Lecture 4

Date & Time:

Wednesday, June 27, 2021 @ 8:30-9:30

Location:

C-0-Auditorium (streaming at P-1-Aula Magna) View Map

Abstract:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus ac arcu eget enim ornare mattis accumsan eu elit. Cras vitae placerat sem. Sed et pulvinar dui. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Nam venenatis pharetra ipsum sit amet volutpat. Aenean tempor non urna ut tempus. In hac habitasse platea dictumst.

Sed fringilla rutrum urna, id accumsan nulla facilisis eget. Pellentesque luctus risus interdum, lacinia magna vulputate, elementum lacus. In nec massa orci. Proin vitae gravida sapien. Donec vehicula rutrum ornare. Morbi finibus, leo nec sagittis lacinia, sapien leo aliquet justo, at malesuada neque dui quis tellus. Nullam dictum arcu id risus euismod elementum. Integer ultricies elit dolor, eget molestie leo vehicula sit amet. Maecenas vel aliquam eros. Fusce egestas vel orci auctor scelerisque. Integer pellentesque vitae sapien at pellentesque. Donec odio sem, auctor ut vestibulum in, sollicitudin ut lorem.

Vivamus vitae auctor lectus, eget vestibulum lectus. Mauris rhoncus ante neque, et volutpat diam molestie et. Vivamus nec mi porta, interdum turpis vitae, malesuada purus. Nullam ac eros odio. Mauris semper velit sit amet erat dapibus, a maximus orci feugiat. Praesent nibh odio, auctor id aliquam at, dictum quis dui. Nullam eget libero id velit luctus posuere. Proin sit amet elit facilisis, imperdiet felis ut, lacinia elit. Quisque venenatis lorem ut felis suscipit iaculis.

Aenean tempor fringilla dapibus. Mauris tincidunt facilisis orci, eu venenatis ligula. Aenean nec massa tellus. Sed hendrerit dolor id est tristique posuere. In quam elit, tincidunt vitae mauris vel, congue consequat enim. Sed consectetur, libero id consectetur varius, quam lorem blandit arcu, vitae facilisis tortor tortor sed ligula. Curabitur et rutrum orci, id rhoncus tortor. Vivamus iaculis eros consectetur faucibus gravida. Phasellus eu elementum libero. Duis sed metus in risus rhoncus dictum quis rutrum metus.

Speaker Bio:

[Speaker bio]

John Smith

Professor
Dept. of Computer Science
University of California, Davis

Name of Lecture 5

Date & Time:

Wednesday, June 27, 2021 @ 8:30-9:30

Location:

C-0-Auditorium (streaming at P-1-Aula Magna) View Map

Abstract:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus ac arcu eget enim ornare mattis accumsan eu elit. Cras vitae placerat sem. Sed et pulvinar dui. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Nam venenatis pharetra ipsum sit amet volutpat. Aenean tempor non urna ut tempus. In hac habitasse platea dictumst.

Sed fringilla rutrum urna, id accumsan nulla facilisis eget. Pellentesque luctus risus interdum, lacinia magna vulputate, elementum lacus. In nec massa orci. Proin vitae gravida sapien. Donec vehicula rutrum ornare. Morbi finibus, leo nec sagittis lacinia, sapien leo aliquet justo, at malesuada neque dui quis tellus. Nullam dictum arcu id risus euismod elementum. Integer ultricies elit dolor, eget molestie leo vehicula sit amet. Maecenas vel aliquam eros. Fusce egestas vel orci auctor scelerisque. Integer pellentesque vitae sapien at pellentesque. Donec odio sem, auctor ut vestibulum in, sollicitudin ut lorem.

Vivamus vitae auctor lectus, eget vestibulum lectus. Mauris rhoncus ante neque, et volutpat diam molestie et. Vivamus nec mi porta, interdum turpis vitae, malesuada purus. Nullam ac eros odio. Mauris semper velit sit amet erat dapibus, a maximus orci feugiat. Praesent nibh odio, auctor id aliquam at, dictum quis dui. Nullam eget libero id velit luctus posuere. Proin sit amet elit facilisis, imperdiet felis ut, lacinia elit. Quisque venenatis lorem ut felis suscipit iaculis.

Aenean tempor fringilla dapibus. Mauris tincidunt facilisis orci, eu venenatis ligula. Aenean nec massa tellus. Sed hendrerit dolor id est tristique posuere. In quam elit, tincidunt vitae mauris vel, congue consequat enim. Sed consectetur, libero id consectetur varius, quam lorem blandit arcu, vitae facilisis tortor tortor sed ligula. Curabitur et rutrum orci, id rhoncus tortor. Vivamus iaculis eros consectetur faucibus gravida. Phasellus eu elementum libero. Duis sed metus in risus rhoncus dictum quis rutrum metus.

Speaker Bio:

[Speaker bio]

John Smith

Professor
Dept. of Computer Science
University of California, Davis